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Are You in a Celiac Menu Food Rut?

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Good day to you.  Many of us live fast-paced lives which causes us to put an important part of our lives, eating, on the back burner of priorities.  This causes a lot of us to purchase the same food items week-to-week and not exploit the many nutritional food choices out there.  For celiac disease survivors this can be especially problematic as nutrition is more important due to eating gluten prior to diagnosis causing malabsorption issues

So how do you raise the priority of creating nutritional meals with variety without compromising any other aspect of your life?  In my experience, I think you can accomplish this in many ways.  Initially, however, I feel you should outline a plan for yourself on paper by answering these questions:

  • How often do I want or need to go to the various food markets I shop at?
  • Do I shop for food items based upon sales advertisements?
  • Do I shop for food items based upon coupons I’ve collected?
  • How many specialized diets (i.e. gluten-free, non-dairy, vegetarian, etc.) am I shopping for?
  • Do I have specific food item cravings often?
  • How much time can I dedicate to cooking each meal?

There may be additional questions you may need to ask yourself depending on your personal and family  lifestyle.  Feel free to write those down with corresponding responses as well.

Now, what do you do with this information?  The information you gathered may be used in several ways.  I would start by setting up your grocery shopping to be the same day every week or however often you need to go to the markets.  Pick the day when your grocer has published new sales advertisements, for example.  By going the same day you are establishing a routine.  This routine will ultimately allow you to “schedule” yourself time to create the grocery lists of food items you need the day before.

Why do I mention scheduling time for yourself to create your grocery lists on the day before you do your food shopping?  So you can make a food plan, or create a menu, for the coming week or other time duration until the next grocery shopping day.  Remember the questions you answered above?  Based upon those responses, you can make outlines of what you’ll need to purchase on grocery shopping day.

Now here’s the bonus, positive part of creating a menu for yourself and your family.  This is the part where you can pull yourself out of your “menu food rut!”  Remember I recommended you “schedule” the day before grocery shopping to create your grocery lists?  Well, if you are creating a menu, then you can find new and interesting foods and recipes to try so you are not purchasing the same foods over and over!  If you are a celiac survivor, you can also take this time to confirm “new to you” food items needed are gluten-free.  When you have planned your menu, guess what?  You now have a stress-free grocery list with no forgotten items!

By creating menu plans and then grocery lists, you are guaranteeing yourself and your family variety, nutrition, and health. 

Research, educate, and advocate all celiac and gluten-free.

Peace be with you.

What Causes a Celiac to Mimic A Gluten Diet?

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Good day to you.  We all know surviving Celiac Disease is no easy task.  Despite that, I’ve decided to raise a very thought-provoking question to my fellow celiac survivors:  “What causes a Celiac to mimic a gluten diet?”  What caused me to raise this question?  The short answer is the feed I receive daily from celiac survivors on Twitter.  I see all kinds of gluten-free cookie, bread, scone, french-toast, dessert and other glutenesque recipes.  I keep asking myself – why are these tweets so popular and/ or so well-responded to?  How are celiac survivors leading a nutrition-filled Life devouring tweets like these as if they are candy?

To educate myself, I went to the Stuffed Pepper website to ask that very question:  What Causes Celiac to Mimic A Gluten Diet?.  To say the least, the responses I received were stark in contrast in regard to what I expected to receive.  Glutenesque recipes are very popular on the internet.  That said the reasons behind them are as diverse as the originating celiac survivor tweep.  Many celiac survivors, I’ve found, are new in their celiac journey and find gluten-free pasta familiar to substitute with what they already knew in regard to gluten pasta recipes.  Other celiac survivors, now gluten-free, use their education with different wheat flours and gluten recipes and transpose them with gluten-free flours and create great gluten-free recipes for us on that end.  Additionally, many celiac survivors create recipes for us solely based upon the celiac survivor need at large.

In that research, I’ve found one common denominator.  Celiacs want to help themselves and each other.  While celiacs like to mimic gluten ingredients, they don’t always depend on those same ingredients to be gluten-free.  Familiar ingredients do create familiar or similar dishes whether with or without gluten.  In general,  I feel celiac survivors want to educate others with gluten-free options which may be similar to the gluten diet, but with their own twist or touch.  Celiac survivors want their cake and eat it and want nutrition as well.

Anecdotally, I do observe savory recipe education is on the rise with the celiac survivor on Twitter.  This is a trend I hope will continue to expand in coming months and years.  Nutrition is of up most importance for the celiac survivor as a result of absorption issues and damage previous gluten ingestion has caused us.  Nutritious, meal-time recipes for celiac survivors are a needed educational resource which all should share.  If you have such ideas, please don’t be afraid to tweet on Twitter or blog on.

Research, educate, and advocate all celiac and gluten-free.

Peace be with you.

Cooking From Scratch with Nutrition and Health

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Good day to you.  If you follow this blog and my Twitter feed, you know me to be very conscious of health and nutrition when preparing meals.  As a celiac, I feel it is most important to eat as healthy as I can due to the damage already done to my digestive system.  With more nutrition packed into each meal, the more nutrients are absorbed and the healthier I am.

When I’m in my kitchen, I like to cook from scratch with recipes whenever possible.  This is helpful to me on a lot of levels.  Foremost, I am in control of what foods go into my dishes.  I’m also in control of the quality of those foods in regard to freshness.  Additionally, I’m able to control the amount of preservatives, sodium, and artificial dyes and flavors in my dishes.  When I cook from scratch, it enables me to have control over each ingredient in my dishes.  I like having this much control as I feel more confident I will not be “glutened” in my own kitchen.  Also, I’m not dependent on any manufacturer of pre-packaged food items in regard to the accuracy of their nutritional and allergen information.

As you probably know in your own lives, I don’t think its possible to cook from scratch every day for every meal.  Life is just not like that.  That said, I’ve seen tips from others whereas they spend the majority of one day cooking for the week ahead and freezing food items in serving size portions.  I’ve seen other tips whereas people will cook items for more than one dish – like chicken for stir-fry with vegetables one night and tacos with lettuce, tomatoes, and cheese the next.  Or, make a salad with fresh greens and vegetables as a side dish for dinner, a lunch the next day, and dinner the next night – cooking from scratch is still being achieved.

As I’ve stated in previous blog posts, I do not live in your household.   You may already have ideas or practices in place to maximize cooking from scratch in the amount of time you have in your kitchen.  If so, good for you!  If not, please reference the Internet and Twitter for good ideas to maximize nutrition and health while cooking from scratch.  Live well and be healthy.

Research, educate, and advocate all celiac and gluten-free – and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness for April.

Peace be with you.

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Nice Bread recipe! I give u kudos on that! 🙂

Re-blogged with permission by Author: @EZ_GFree (https://twitter.com/#!/ezgfree).  Thank you.  🙂

EZ G-Free

Here’s a paleo and gluten-free bread recipe that I can honestly say kicks any gluten or gluten-free right to the curb!

This yeast-free bread is light for a gluten-free bread. It’s buttery nut flavour with the full organic aroma of olive oil soothe all the senses.

Ingredients

  • 5 Eggs
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 3 Tbsp. Raw Honey or Pure Maple Syrup
  • 2 Tbsp. Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 1/2 cups Almond Meal
  • 3 Tbsp. Coconut Flour
  • 1/3 cup Flax Meal
  • 1/4 tsp. Sea Salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 2 tsp. Cinnamon
  • 1 Tbsp. Seeds

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a loaf pan.

Whisk the eggs. Add the olive oil, honey/maple syrup, and apple cider vinegar to the egg mix.

Next, mix the almond meal, coconut flour, flax meal, sea salt, baking soda, and cinnamon in another bowl.

Add the dry mix, 1/2 cup at a time, to…

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Celiac and Nutritional Diet – The Natural Way

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Good day to you.  If you follow me on Twitter (@GFDougie via https://twitter.com/#!/GFDougie), you know me to be very Nutrition-conscious and Health-minded in regard to what a celiac diet should be.

While noting the celiac diet is not a very easy diet to follow for all the ingredient reading, ingredient interpreting, and internet research; there are easier methods in following the diet which are more stress free.  What are those methods?  I’m glad you asked.  There are many ways you can enjoy, yes I said enjoy, a celiac diet and maintain nutrition relatively stress free.  Let’s start at the local Grocer, and the Produce department.  Many vegetables and fruits await you there – and they have no ingredient list to read!  There are different squash varieties you can sauté in olive oil together with onion, herb and spice; you can cook together tomato, okra, herb and spice in a saucepan; or you can make a soup of potato, onion, herb and spice, and cream.  You can also find “stir-fry vegetables” in a bag, add chicken or tofu, gluten-free soy or tamari sauce, and call it dinner!  What about making a fruit salad, grilling pineapples, or sautéing apples with sugar and cinnamon?  Can you say “peaches & cream?”

If you are into more wholesome, organic produce choices for your celiac diet, a cheaper alternative to the grocer is the farmer’s market.  Buying from locally grown vegetable/ fruit markets supports your local economy.  The benefit to you is “natural.”  Buy in-season vegetables and fruits at these markets at “rock-bottom” prices and save yourself some money.  Corn on the cob and lima beans can be transformed into fried corn or succotash.  You can use gluten-free bread and make breaded tomatoes.  Heck, you can even use an All Purpose Gluten-free Flour blend and make … fried green tomatoes!  How about fresh-snapped green beans and mashed potatoes?  What about stuffed bell peppers with rice, beef, and gluten-free seasonings!  The choices for menu options are endless.

Let’s go back to the Grocer, and Frozen Foods, and see how easy this can be for the celiac diet.  Again, the ingredient list is not hard to comprehend:  peas, corn, onions, green beans, cauliflower, broccoli, etc.  Not much to read there, right?  How many  meals can you make with so many combinations?  Almost endless, I think.  You can make stews, soups, casseroles and many more things I’m not thinking of at a fraction of the cost of fresh produce.  Side dishes made with these items are even more unlimited!

If you are not vegan, other stress free celiac-friendly departments at the Grocer are the Meat and Seafood departments.  Obviously chicken, turkey, pork, and seafood are more healthful than beef.  But, with moderation, all can be included in a celiac diet at no risk of ingesting gluten.

The bottom line – instant, boxed, or microwaved entrées and other food items are not as nutritional.  Cook from scratch and know what you are eating.  The burden is upon you on how nutritious you are.

Research, educate, and advocate all celiac and gluten-free – and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness in April.

Peace be with you.

Recipe – Apple Currant Salad via T. R. Crumbley

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“Apple Currant Salad”

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Servings: 3-4 salads

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 small yellow onion
  • 1 green apple
  • 1/4 cup currants
  • 4 oz baby lettuce
  • 2 oz frisee
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp dijon mustard
  • 3 tbsp olive oil

Steps:

Slice the onion. In a small saucepan sautee the onion until caramelized. Set aside.

Slice the apple, and toss with the onion, currants, lettuce and frisee.

In a small bowl, whisk together the honey, mustard, and oil. Add to the salad mix and toss until the greens are coated. Lightly salt and pepper.


T.R. Crumbley
No One Likes Crumbley Cookies
http://tcrumbley.blogspot.com/